Plague Surgeon and Noxious Blightbringer

After writing last week’s battle report, I realized I’d missed a few essential characters in my Death Guard army when I did up my galleries – sort of! They showed up in the background of some of the other pictures but I wanted to give them a dedicated spot of their own to shine. They’re two of my favorite miniature designs in the Death Guard line – though all of the recent Death Guard Elite characters are pretty great in that regard.

Pictured: Nurglings, still being my favorite part of painting Death Guard.

And now with my whole batch posted, I find myself thinking about what I’m going to do with the next batch, once my Masters’ is done and once I have more free time on my hands. As it stands I have the Death Guard half of a Know No Fear starter still needing painting (along with a few fun other models), and as good as my first “batch” has turned out I want my next Plague Marines to stand out even more.

Pictured: My typical Death Guard character lineup.

As much as I like the color scheme that I went with generally and the rust effects, I think my next batch is going to emphasize a more Horus Heresy color scheme, where armor is visible, and I also think I’m going to try and switch up the brown color I used for cloth. It blends too much with the other colors, and when I’ve seen people go for violet or red-colored cloaks it looks like it pops much better. Maybe something like a wine-red? We’ll see.

Lord Felthius and the Tainted Cohort

Pictured, Lord Felthius – a Lord of Contagion model with a lot of personality.

With Games Workshop recently removing most of the line of Easy to Build kits introduced in 8th edition, I’m glad that I got a hold of these models when I did! I hadn’t done much in terminator-sized models up to this point and initially I found the sheer number of details on these a little daunting, but each of the models in this set ended up looking really distinct with their own individual presence and personality.

Pictured, my favorite part of painting Death Guard – the Nurglings!

With recent Power Level updates I’m not altogether sure the Tainted Cohort can be fielded on its own anymore, which means it might be worth picking up the regular Blightlord Terminators at some point, but even once I do I think I’m going to find excuses to use these models as part of that squad because they just look so imposing. And, as always, I love Nurglings.

Crusade Upgrades!

Pictured: My “Crusade” Howling Banshees with updated runes, bases and power swords.

Recently with my ninth edition handbook I picked up one of the Crusade journal; a narrative-style campaign in 40K has been on my to-do list for a long time, and since I’m lucky enough to have a few friends locally interested in the same thing I’m giving it a whirl. I hope to post and chat about different games that I’ve played and show a few battle reports on the site, but before getting too carried away I also decided that some of my existing models needed a little more love before hitting the tabletop.

Pictured, my old Farseer model vs. Eldrad Ulthran, playing the part of my Crusade Farseer.

Not that I always play favorites, but if I did they’d be Jain Zar, my Banshees, my Wave Serpent, and my psykers, so those are some of the models I either redid from scratch or refitted. Guy from Midwinter Minis has an awesome tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gNfrCS263s) for using nail flakes and I tried to apply this to all of my power swords, which gave them a really nice new glimmering effect under natural light.

Pictured, my Wave Serpent post-upgrades with a higher base. Vanes make a big difference!

All in all I think I’m ready for this campaign now and ready for my Eldar to make a splash on the tabletop. Eldrad’s going to be getting a gallery of his own in the next while, too, and I have some other galleries (and battle reports) planned over the next while too. Still going to be slow going till the thesis is done but I’m pretty excited with where painting and playing are going from here!

Before, After, and Next Steps

Pictured, Guardian from 2018 vs. Storm Guardian from 2020.

Felt like I needed a win today, so I’m posting something fun. When I started painting Warhammer again back in 2018 I started with a handful of Guardians, Howling Banshees, and psykers, and after a couple of years I thought it would be neat to compare some of the first models I did with the models I’ve been painting more recently.

Pictured, Howling Banshee from 2018 vs. Howling Banshee from 2020.

I’m happy to say that I think I’ve made strides as far as my painting goes – the more recent colors pop better and I think I’m getting better at picking contrasting colors that look good together. More than that, though, using occasional resin bases, kitbashing, and my basing have all moved a little out of my original comfort zone and I’m excited to see what kind of improvements I’ll have made in another two years’ time.

Lastly, I want to add that because I’m working on a thesis right now and moving into “crunch” time I’m likely not going to be uploading much over the next month or so. Hoping to focus on that for a while and hopefully come back to painting refreshed – I have a few Eldar and Death Guard projects primed and ready to paint and a new “mystery” army I’m excited to build too.

Thanks for the support and views, and see you on the other side!

Biologus Putrifier and Foul Blightspawn

Pictured: A Biologus Putrifier and Foul Blightspawn leading Plague Marines forward.

These are two of my favorite Death Guard models, and since their effects synergize so well together – and since they work together so frequently in the lore – I thought I’d let them share a gallery together. The Biologus Putrifier and Foul Blightspawn were a blast to work on, and I got to do even more with some of the goopy, slime effects I’d been using across my bases.

As blight grenades explode and anguished victims scream, Biologus Putrifier’s study the effects of their concoctions, noting the results. They improve their grenades through these lives tests on the battlefield.

I really like the unconventional mask shapes that they use, and there were lots of neat little details that I could embellish on both of these models. The Biologus’ needle and “wings” are great details, and the Nurgling on the Foul Blightspawn is a delight. I think half of the reason that I went with a Nurgle chaos-based army is that I’m growing to love the endearing little gremlins.

Plague Marines (Easy-to-Build)

Pictured: The Plague Champion, my personal favorite of the ETB models.

After the handful of Chaos Space Marine bits a friend gave me, I picked up the Death Guard painting kit and split a First Strike starter with the same friend, which gave me enough to put together a five-person squad. The Easy-to-Build kits were a fantastic place to start – they went together without any issues and looked wonderfully horrific.

Pictured: New ETB Plague Marines together with my kitbashed Plague Marines.

These were a lot of fun to put together, and for being “starter” or ETB marines they’re kitted out pretty decently too! The Blight Launchers are useful and the combination of Power Fist and Plasma Gun on the Champion are nothing to scoff at either. Really looking forward to running these and the rest of my Nurgle army once 9th Edition drops.

Howling Banshees

Tallithea swallowed hard, caught between her desire to see the ceremony under way and her fear of doing so. The scream of the banshee was gaining strength inside her, rising in volume, demanding to be let free. She feared that if she did not don her war mask soon it would erupt anyway, with who could say what disastrous consequences?

Howling Banshees are my absolute all-time favorite Eldar unit. They were some of the first 40k models I ever owned and I’ve kept them as a mainstay of my army ever since. I’ve painted tons of oldhammer ones, and recently decided I was going to repaint a batch of my metal ones to see how much better I could do this time around.

They don’t take Overwatch, they can Advance and Charge with a bonus, and they get to fight first when Jain Zar is around. What’s not to love?

The results are everything I hoped for, and with their shiny new resin scenic bases they fit in brilliantly with the newly-released Jain Zar model. As much as I love my Oldhammer banshees, which I’ll probably post up here too sometime, I think this is going to be my Banshee A-Team for a good long time comin’.

Bonesinger Ry’hil

Bonesinger Ry’hil, right, pictured with my Autarch, Matthias, and my Spiritseer, Caen’thala.

Ry’hil is a Bonesinger I use as a stand-in for Eldrad Ulthran during friendly games because I love the way that the model looks (and because I finished him just in time for GW to shoo him off to Legends!) When I started getting into 40K I played a lot of the original Dawn of War, and I always thought the Bonesingers were one of the most interesting Eldar units in the game.

Bonesinger Ry’hil, pictured mending a nearby wraith construct.

The Bonesinger had a really neat but brief time in the sun in 8th edition, being one of the only Eldar units that can repair or heal another. Very happy with how this one turned out as a painting project, and I think it’s underrated in what a pretty design the model is.